Episode 4: Alexis Pauline Gumbs reads “Gut” from Obsidian 45.1

In this episode, Alexis Pauline Gumbs reads her hybrid story “Gut” from Obsidian 45.1.

NOTES

i. nature from “Rethinking ‘Aesthetics’ Notes Towards a Deciphering Practice” by Sylvia Wynter, 272

ii. the correlated otherness continuum from “Human Being as Noun? Or Being Human as Praxis? Towards the Autopoetic Turn/Overturn” by Sylvia Wynter, 22

iii. name from “Ethno or Sociopoetics” by Sylvia Wynter, 87
iv. we still have no name from “The Re-Enchantment of Humanism: An Interview with Sylvia Wynter” by David, 137

v. at the level from “No Humans Involved: An Open Letter to My Colleagues” by Sylvia Wynter, 66

vi. positively marked/menstrual blood from “Rethinking ‘Aesthetics’ Notes Towards a Deciphering Practice” by Sylvia Wynter, 252

vii. the exiled captive priests from “Human Being as Noun? Or Being Human as Praxis? Towards the Autopoetic Turn/Overturn” by Sylvia Wynter, 24

viii. cannot be seen from “No Humans Involved: An Open Letter to My Colleagues” by Sylvia Wynter, 64

ix. the price paid for our well being from “No Humans Involved: An Open Letter to My Colleagues” by Sylvia Wynter, 70

x. rigorously abductive from “Human Being as Noun? Or Being Human as Praxis? Towards the Autopoetic Turn/Overturn” by Sylvia Wynter, 18

xi. justice, not as grim retribution, but as shared happiness from “The Re-Enchantment of Humanism: An Interview with Sylvia Wynter” by David, 124

 Alexis Pauline Gumbs is a Queer Black Troublemaker and Black Feminist Love Evangelist and an aspirational cousin to all sentient beings. Her work in this lifetime is to facilitate infinite, unstoppable ancestral love in practice. Her poetic work in response to the needs of her cherished communities have held space for multitudes in mourning and movement. Alexis’s co-edited volume of Revolutionary Mothering: Love on the Front Lines (PM Press, 2016) has shifted the conversation on mothering, parenting and queer transformation. Alexis has transformed the scope of intellectual, creative and oracular writing with her triptych of experimental works published by Duke University Press (Spill: Scenes of Black Feminist Fugitivity in 2016, M Archive: After the End of the World in 2018 and Dub: Finding Ceremony in March 2020.) Unlike most academic texts, Alexis’s work has inspired artists across form to create dance works, installation work, paintings, processionals, divination practices, operas, quilts and more.

Founded in 1975, Obsidian: Literature & Arts in the African Diaspora supports—through publication and critical inquiry—the contemporary poetry, fiction, drama/performance, visual and media art of Africans globally. Recognized by the National Endowment of the Arts as one of the premier journals dedicated to Africa and African Diaspora Literatures, Obsidian is published biannually in print, and year round online at this new website and also at our Obsidian website hosted by Illinois State University. Since its inception, Obsidian has featured a range of acclaimed writers and critics including Elizabeth Alexander, Houston A. Baker, Abena John Brown, Octavia Butler, Wanda Coleman, Thadious Davis, Melvin Dixon, Gerald Early, C.S. Giscombe, Terrance Hayes, Essex Hemphill, Gayl Jones, Yusef Komunyakaa, Brenda Marie Osbey, Claudia Rankine, Jerry Ward, and Gloria Wade Gayles among others.


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